The Poettrio Experiment at Poetry International, Rotterdam

For the 48th Poetry International Festival in Rotterdam, we took The Poettrio Experiment’s British poets, Sean O’Brien, Fiona Sampson, and Bill Herbert over to the Netherlands to carry out translation laboratories with Dutch poets Menno Wigman, Hélène Gelèns, and Elma van Haren and language advisors Karlein van den Beukel, Willem Groenewegen and Rosemary Mitchell-Schuitevoerder.

Over three days, the British and Dutch poets worked with language advisors in threes to translate the British poetry into Dutch. We filmed and recorded the trios working together, with researchers (Dr Jones, Dr Johnson and Dr Lobejón Santos) sitting in and observing how the trios worked to resolve ‘untranslatables’ and ambiguities, teased out the nuance in the British poems and interacted personally. 

After each day’s translating, we interviewed trio participants about their experience of that day’s trio – as the next day, they’d be working in a new trio. 

The trios produced a lot of exciting translations and we gathered a large amount of data about how the trio structure worked, as well as how the laboratory worked – remembering that people’s bodies were as important as their minds. Heat, hospital visits, appetites and seating positions all became factors in how trio participants felt that the translation process worked.

As part of the festival programme on Friday, the Dutch and British poets read a selection of their translated poetry, and one trio of Professor Fiona Sampson, Dr Karlien van den Beukel and Hélène Gelèns discussed the process of working together.

Principal Investigator Dr Francis R. Jones and Research Associates Dr Rebecca May Johnson and Dr Sergio Lobejón Santos discussed the trio laboratories with Jan Baeke on stage in front of an audience of festival attendees, commenting on the kind of quantitative and qualitative data we’ll be looking at for our analysis. 

See a link to our Poetry International Festival page here. Video of our presentation to follow. 

The Three Polis: Scots and Intralingual Translation

Our collaborator Bill’s reflection on Saturday’s translation panel at Newcastle Poetry Festival and thoughtful exploration on issues of translation relating to Scots, and English in our experiment.

gairnet provides: press of blll

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The panel I took part in on translation at last week’s Newcastle Poetry Festival raised a number of issues of equal fascination to both poets and translators, and, one would hope, readers of both. I found myself as excited by the far-ranging nature of the discussion, and the diversity of approaches of the panel, as I was impatient to think through how it related to my own practice.

From Jean Boase-Beier’s intense engagement with the text, usually solitary, usually focussed on the work of dead poets, trusting to etymology to deepen her investigation, to Erica Jarnes’s discussion of the responsibility of the translator to engage with and represent work outside the Grand Old Men of European heritage – thinking in particular of the Poetry Translation Centre’s representation of the poetry of minority, usually, immigrant, cultures within that European context; from Fiona Sampson’s subtle distinction between the meaning of the words…

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Translation as Collaboration | Call for submissions

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Translation as Collaboration

Call for submissions

Opening up the theme of translation to broad interpretation, The Poettrio Experiment are commissioning collaborative translations from all creative disciplines: writers, translators, artists, musicians, filmmakers…

Find a collaborator and translate each other’s work within or across different media.

Translate a text into an image, an image into a text, an Instagram picture into a poem, a Tweet into a film, an object into a short story, a poem into a composition…

Translate between different languages or translate between Englishes: translate an ‘English’ poem or prose into your English voice filled with your experience, or Scouse, or Scots or a Diasporic English. You could change the location, the scenery, the slang, the voice but somehow… translate.

Translate from a language you don’t know: read it like code and carry its graphic patterns into a new translated text or medium…

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: 1st July 2017

Performances of texts, films and compositions should last no longer than 5 minutes.

Public performance open to all in Newcastle University on

Thursday July 20th 2017 

DISCUSS your translation process on a new podcast for translation & creative disciplines at the University of Newcastle. 

Email queries to: rebecca.johnson3@newcastle.ac.uk

Twitter: @poettrios 

If you want to participate but don’t have a collaborator, contact us and we will find you one! 

The Poettrio Experiment is an AHRC-funded project researching translation trios based at Newcastle University, with The University of Roehampton.

Translation at Newcastle Poetry Festival w/ Bill Herbert, Fiona Sampson, Sophie Collins, Erica Jarnes and Joan Boase-Beier

‘All translation is only a provisional way of coming to terms with the foreignness of languages.’

Walter Benjamin

Discussion: Poetry and Translation

During Newcastle Poetry Festival, two members of the Poettrio Experiment, poets Bill Herbert and Fiona Sampson, will be taking part in a panel discussion about translating poetry with Professor Jean Boase-Beier from UEA, poet, editor and translator Sophie Collins who produced the groundbreaking volume of translated poetry Currently and Emotion: Translations, and Erica Jarnes writer, composer and managing director of The Poetry Translation Centre. 

Come along!

15:00–16:00 | Northern Stage, University of Newcastle | Stage 2 | FREE

 

The Poettrio Experiment begins…

Follow the progress of our investigation into poetry translation trios here!

Coming up 30th May- 2nd June we have workshops in Rotterdam at Poetry International Festival where poets and project co-investigators Bill Herbert and Fiona Sampson and poet Sean O’Brien will be working with three Dutch poets Elma van Haren, Hélène Gélèns and  Menno Wigman and language advisors Karlien van den Beukel, Willem Groenewegen and Rosemary Mitchell-Schuitevoerder to translate poetry collaboratively, in real time.

The poets, who are not experts in the source languages, will choose which of each other’s poems to translate, and work together with the language advisors to produce translations. Afterwards they will be interviewed about the process of choosing the poems and translating them. 

There will be a public presentation performance at the end of the week in Rotterdam of the poems translated in the workshops. More details soon!